acquirement


acquirement
acquirement, acquisition, attainment, accomplishment denote in common a power or skill that is the fruit of exertion or effort; in this sense they are often used in the plural.
Acquirement implies achievement as a result of continued endeavor and self-cultivation rather than of natural gifts or talent
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a woman of considerable information and literature; acquirements not common amongst . . . ladies— Edgeworth

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Acquisition may add to acquirement the implications that the thing acquired is an addition or gain and that the endeavor to acquire has been characterized by avidity and stress
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perhaps it was a mistake to force her into the rigid groove of classical learning . . . from it she got very unusual acquisitions, but overstimulation broke her health— Parrington

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As applied to an acquired power or skill, acquisition usually stresses, as acquirement does not, the inherent value of that power or skill
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absolute disinterestedness is a rare acquisition, even in historians

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no philosopher would resign his mental acquisitions for the purchase of any terrestrial good— Peacock

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Attainment commonly refers to distinguished achievements as in the arts, in statesmanship, in science; it suggests fully developed talent
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artists of high attainments

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remarkable literary attainments

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Accomplishment refers to any acquired power or grace such as may make for agreeable social intercourse
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my new accomplishment of dancing— Charles Churchill

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we found that even for Men of Science this neat clean carving of words was a very necessary accomplishmentQuiller-Couch

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an accomplishment of which he was a perfect exponent, the interchange of humorous and agreeable civilities— Repplier

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Analogous words: achievement (see FEAT): *addition, accretion
Contrasted words: *lack, want, dearth, defect, privation

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms: